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A History Of The Cottages

 
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  • The original layout below, was built with 16 dormitories. They were all of similar design. Two story brown brick structures. They all had full basements that had tunnels connecting them to the Powerhouse. The cottages made up about half of all the buildings that were built for the new Wayne County Training School.

 
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  • Designed by Marcus Robinson Burrowes they were done in the "Arts and Crafts" style. All of the entrances faced south towards the front of the complex. This was in stark contrast to the previous method of building a large hospital type building with many wards. Judge Henry Hulbert was appalled by the inhumane conditions he witnessed at the state home in Lapear when he had called for the county board to come up with a solution to ease the terrible conditions that wards of the state were forced to live in.

 
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  • The cottages of the WCTS were spread out over dozens of landscaped acres in a park like setting. To the east was a bluff overlooking the Rouge River. The girls cottages were on the east half of the property, the boys were to the west.

 
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  • A few years later 3 additional cottages were added. They were designed by Aaron and Nathaniel Gould. All were built as cottages for boys. They were not done in the same style as the older cottages. The Gould's also designed several other buildings that were added after the initial construction. The only cottage to be built west of Sheldon road was named the Farm Colony Cottage and was the first cottage used in the Homestead program. Started by Samuel A Kirk in 1935 it was ground breaking and gave the WCTS worldwide attention. The 3 cottages that the Gould's designed were all used for the Homestead program.

 
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Farm Colony Cottage

 

  • This made a total of 19 cottages. One cottage on the girls side was designated as the Sick Ward. It was not used as official living quarters and was listed as Dormitory D. A 20th cottage was added in the late 1950's as the Special Treatment Unit. It was previously the Officers Residence. Since employees were generally not living on the grounds by the 1950's it was claimed for its new purpose. The Special Treatment Unit was the project of Henry Gotwald and probably one of the last great achievements of the school before closing a little more then a decade later.

 
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The Special Treatment Unit

 



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